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Teacher Work Sample Part Two

Misook Marcus

C360 – TWS in English Language Learning

Western Governors University

February 27, 2015

Dean Janitzki

Teacher Work Sample Unit

Courtesy of Taskstream (2015)

VITAL INFORMATION

Subject(s)

ESL, Reading

Grade/Level

Grade 9, Grade 10, Grade 11, Grade 12

Time Required

Approximately Six Weeks (Four 45-minute lessons and one 30-minute lesson per week.)

Objective(s)

– Students can participate in discussion sessions after the class reads each section or chapter actively. Students will share at least three opinions or facts of each section or chapter they will read.

– Students will read the storybook fluently during class. Students will perfect their reading aloud skills by participating in popcorn reading or round robin reading sessions.

– Students will use the vocabularies and idioms fluently in real life after they learned these facts through many vocabularies and idioms review sessions in class. Students can use these learned facts without hesitation in real life conversations.

Goal(s)

– I can understand the context of the storybook.

– I can read the storybook text fluently without any hesitation.

– I can apply the vocabularies and idioms that frequently appear in the storybook in real life communication without too much trouble.

Topic(s)

Sibling rivalry, miIDle school life at home, at school, and in social settings, and teenage love.

IMPLEMENTATION

Learning Activities

This unit contains 19 sessions of reading each of the 19 sections of the storybook and solving study guide questions. This unit contains four review sessions of vocabularies, idioms, and keywords. This unit contains three viewing sessions of video clips related to the storybook. This unit contains five special lessons learning about new facts related to the storybook.

<Section Reading and Study Guide Questions>

  1. The storybook contains 19 sections in total.
  2. The teacher starts out reading a few paragraphs of each section.
  3. The children all take turns reading few paragraphs until the end of each section.
  4. The teacher hands out a study guide each to the children. The children solve the study guide questions. The children can discuss answers with one another to come up with perfect answers.

<Review Sessions of the Vocabularies, Idioms, and Key Words>

  1. The initial session starts out with children filling out the blank vocabularies and idioms worksheet by copying information from the PowerPoint presentation.
  2. Before all this, the teacher will read through the book. She will pick out some key words, vocabularies and idioms that frequently appear in the book. She will look these up in the storybook and the dictionary. She will prepare a PowerPoint presentation that mentions the words, idioms, and their definition. She will also prepare a PowerPoint presentation of the keywords and the findings for those keywords, too.
  3. The teacher shows the children the PowerPoint presentations of the definitions and example sentences of each vocabulary and idiom.
  4. The children will solve worksheets using the information copied from the PowerPoint presentation to review the vocabularies and idioms.
  5. The keywords review is similar to the idioms and vocabularies PowerPoint presentation. The children will see the keywords and the facts related to these keywords in a PowerPoint presentation. The children and the teacher will orally discuss what these facts can be. Once the discussion ends, the teacher will list the facts with the keywords. The children will have the option to copy these facts in their notebooks.

<Viewing of Video Clips Related to the Storybook>

  1. The teacher will identify some facts the children may have difficulty associating themselves with.
  2. The teacher will find video clips from the Internet or other sources such as the local library.
  3. The teacher will play these video clips in class. There may be worksheets related to these video clips. Then the children will solve these worksheets. The children may discuss with one another for possible answers.

<Five Special Lessons Learning About New Facts Related to the Storybook>

  1. The teacher will give out texts that have relations to the storybook.
  2. The class will read these texts aloud using the popcorn or round robin reading method.
  3. The teacher will give out worksheets related to the texts.
  4. The children will solve these worksheets. The children may discuss with one another for possible answers.

 

Then there are two sessions where the children will take tests. During the first one, the children will take a pre-test. During the second one, they will take a post-test. Both will last about 30 minutes long.

Resources and Unit Handouts

The storybook Who Put That Hair In My Toothbrush? by Jerry Spinelli, the Study Guide worksheets (19 total), the laptop, the projector, PowerPoint presentations (Vocabularies and Idioms Review, French Cruller, Dimples, Key Words Review, and Wayne Gretzky), Worksheets (Vocabularies and Idioms, Ice Hockey, and Conestoga), pre-test, post-test, and Video Clips (Lacrosse, Halley’s Comet, and the book summary).

ASSESSMENT & STANDARDS

Standards

UT- Utah Core Curriculum Standards (2013)

Subject: English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects

Grade: Grades 9–10 students:

Content Area: English Language Arts

Strand: Reading Standards for Literature

Domain: Key Ideas and Details

Standard:

Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

Standard:

Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.

Standard:

Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.

Domain: Craft and Structure

Standard:

Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language evokes a sense of time and place; how it sets a formal or informal tone).

Standard:

Analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it (e.g., parallel plots), and manipulate time (e.g., pacing, flashbacks) create such effects as mystery, tension, or surprise.

Standard:

Analyze a particular point of view or cultural experience reflected in a work of literature from outside the United States, drawing on a wide reading of world literature.

Domain: Integration of Knowledge and Ideas

Standard:

Analyze the representation of a subject or a key scene in two different artistic mediums, including what is emphasized or absent in each treatment (e.g., Auden’s “Musée des Beaux Arts” and Breughel’s Landscape with the Fall of Icarus).

Standard:

Analyze how an author draws on and transforms source material in a specific work (e.g., how Shakespeare treats a theme or topic from Ovid or the Bible or how a later author draws on a play by Shakespeare).

Domain: Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity

Standard:

By the end of Grade 9, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 9–10 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range. By the end of Grade 10, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, at the high end of the grades 9–10 text complexity band independently and proficiently.

Grade: Grades 11–12 students:

Content Area: English Language Arts

Strand: Reading Standards for Literature

Domain: Key Ideas and Details

Standard:

Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.

Standard:

Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to produce a complex account; provide an objective summary of the text.

Standard:

Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed).

 

Domain: Craft and Structure

Standard:

Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors.)

Standard:

Analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text (e.g., the choice of where to begin or end a story, the choice to provide a comedic or tragic resolution) contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact.

Standard:

Analyze a case in which grasping point of view requires distinguishing what is directly stated in a text from what is really meant (e.g., satire, sarcasm, irony, or understatement).

Domain: Integration of Knowledge and Ideas

Standard:

Analyze multiple interpretations of a story, drama, or poem (e.g., recorded or live production of a play or recorded novel or poetry), evaluating how each version interprets the source text. (Include at least one play by Shakespeare and one play by an American dramatist.)

Standard:

Demonstrate knowledge of eighteenth-, nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century foundational works of American literature, including how two or more texts from the same period treat similar themes or topics.

Domain: Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity

Standard:

By the end of Grade 11, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the Grades 11–CCR text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range. By the end of Grade 12, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, at the high end of the grades 11–CCR text complexity band independently and proficiently.

USA- WIDA English Language Proficiency Standards

Grade Cluster: Grades 9-12

ELP Standard: ELP Standard 2: The Language of Language Arts, Formative Framework

Domain: READING

Level: Level 3 Developing

Indicator: Match cause of influences on familiar people’s lives with effect using visuals and multi-sentence text in small groups

Indicator: Identify evidence of bias in various texts using models or criteria and share with a partner

ELP Standard: ELP Standard 2: The Language of Language Arts, Summative Framework

Domain: READING

Level: Level 3 Developing

Indicator: Match cause of influences on people’s lives with effect using visuals and multi-sentence text

Indicator: Identify main ideas and supporting details related to author’s perspective in visually supported paragraphs

Assessment/Rubrics

This unit has a pre- and post-test. There are no specific rubrics that correspond to the tests. The children will receive number scores, according to the grading scales of Independence High School.

<The Grading Scale>     (Independence High School, 2015)

A 100% ~ 93%

A- 92% ~90%

B+ 89% ~ 87%

B 86% ~ 83%

B- 82% ~ 80%

C+ 79% ~ 77%

C 76% ~ 73%

C- 72% ~ 70%

F Below 69%

Copies of Assessment Instruments

Pre-Assessment of the Unit

Courtesy of Marcus (2015)

< Pre-Test of Who Put That Hair In My Toothbrush?> – by Jerry Spinelli

Name: _____________________________________________

  1. Describe what could potentially happen in this book just by reading the title of the book.
  1. What could these idioms mean?
  2. To be a rat
  1. To give someone the third degree
  1. Make a beeline
  1. Piece of cake
  1. What could these words mean?
  2. gawk
  1. grovel
  1. boggle
  1. pry

Post-Assessment of the Unit

Courtesy of Marcus and Grimshaw (2015)

Name __________________________________

Final Assessment of Who Put That Hair In My Toothbrush?

  1. Next to each phrase below, explain in as much detail as you can what each phrase has to do with the book. Try to write at least five details about each item.
  2. Ice Hockey
  1. Zoe Miranda
  1. Something French
  1. Emilie Bain
  1. The Egg

 

  1. The following are the vocabulary words that often appeared in our book. Please match the words to the correct definitions by drawing a line from the word to its definition.
  2. gawk (adj) confused or bewildered
  3. pout   (verb) to extract, detach, pull apart, or open with difficulty
  4. snicker (verb) to be unable to think clearly; to stare because you’re amazed or confused
  5. smirk (verb) to humble oneself or to lie or crawl with the face downward to show humility, fear, etc.
  6. swoon (verb) to growl or show anger by a snapping, gnashing, or display of teeth
  7. sneer (verb) to speak or act in a whining, sniffling, tearful, or weakly emotional manner
  8. grovel (verb) to smile in an unpleasant way because you are pleased with yourself, glad about someone else’s trouble, etc.
  9. snivel (verb) to suIDenly faint because of excitement or surprise
  10. snarl (verb) to smile or laugh at someone or something with an expression on your face that shows dislike and a lack of respect
  11. pry (verb) to stare at someone or something in a rude or stupid way
  12. boggle (verb) to make a short, quiet laugh in a way that shows disrespect
  13. baffled (noun) an expression of the face where the lips are pushed out to show you are angry or annoyed
  1. The following are the idioms that appeared in our book often. Please write the correct letter of the definition from the box next to the numbered idiom below the box. Then below each idiom, write a sentence that includes the idiom.
  2. to head straight toward someone or something
  3. to be crazy
  4. to ask someone a long and detailed series of questions as if you’re interrogating the person
  5. to marry or date someone who is much younger than you
  6. something easy to do
  7. to be a despicable person, especially one who tells on or betrays others
  8. to be easily influenced by someone else

 

  1. to be a rat _____

 

  1. to give someone the third degree _____

 

  1. be off your rocker _____

 

  1. to be putty in someone’s hands _____

 

  1. make a beeline _____

 

  1. to rob the cradle _____

 

  1. piece of cake _____

Pre-Assessment

The pre-assessment has the following intentions. Concerning the first and second learning goals, the first questions of the pre-assessment has the intentions of bringing the children’s attention to the storybook. I hope that the children will use their imagination to predict how the story will unfold as we read the storybook. I hope that the children will show much interest in reading this storybook fluently and understand the entire context after they take this pre-assessment. Concerning the third learning goal, the pre-assessment has some vocabularies and idioms that the children may know already. The pre-assessment has the intentions to see if the children already know a few of these vocabularies and idioms that appear in the book frequently. The pre-assessment has the intentions of helping the students perfect their knowledge of these items by trying to recall their prior knowledge of these and build upon these facts they know already.

Summative Assessment

Concerning the first and second learning goals, the first section of the summative assessment has the intentions of assessing the children’s comprehension of the book after the class finish reading the entire book together. These keywords frequently appear throughout the book. If the children pay attention in class and pay close attention to reading the book aloud in class using the round robin method, the children can read the book without hesitation and fluently. If the children pay attention to the details when reading the book, the children can gather the information needed to fill in the facts that correspond to each keyword. The review session of these keywords at the end of reading the book should help them remember the facts needed to write the answers that correspond to each keyword. Concerning the third learning goal, the second and third sections of the summative assessment have the intentions of testing to see if the children will manage to remember the vocabularies and idioms that often appear in the book. The summative assessment has the intentions to see if the children will be ready to use these items in real life without too much trouble. The following actions may help the children remember these items well. The children must pay attention to the initial session of learning the vocabularies and idioms. The review sessions of these items in different formats such as oral review or solving worksheets throughout the practicum should help the children remember them. The review sessions of these items while reading the book when these items show up should help the children remember them.

References

Independence High School. (2015). The grading scale. Provo, UT.

Marcus, M. (2015). Pre-test of who put that hair in my toothbrush?. Orem, UT.

Marcus, M., & Grimshaw, J. (2015). Final assessment of who put that hair in my toothbrush? . Provo, UT.

Spinelli, J. (2000, April). Who put that hair in my toothbrush?. New York, NY: Little, Brown Books for Young Readers.

Taskstream. (2015). Teacher work sample unit. Retrieved from https://www.taskstream.com/Main/main_frame.asp

Taskstream. (2015). Utah ELA 9th – 12th standards. Retrieved from https://www.taskstream.com/Main/main_frame.asp

Taskstream. (2015). WIDA standards. Retrieved from https://www.taskstream.com/Main/main_frame.asp

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